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SUPPORT THE CLASS OF '75


PROFILE UPDATES


•   Marcia Wilson (Hermann)  10/26
•   Tim Horne  9/20
•   Paula Houlehan (Qualls)  9/19
•   Katherine Byrd (Morgan)  9/19
•   Mark Sneegas  9/8
•   Bob Cooper (Cooper)  9/8
•   Greg Wirzfeld  9/7
•   Jim Hindery  9/6
•   Teresa Ketron (Conley)  8/22
•   Kim Beckstrand (Mayer)  8/13
Show More

UPCOMING BIRTHDAYS



•   Mandy Cossett (Barham)  12/3
•   Melinda Gibbons (Prunty)  12/5
•   Mike Kelley  12/10
•   Julia Claggett (Hanheide)  12/11
•   Mark Hans  12/11
•   Mike Leake  12/11
•   Robin Sutphin (Robinette)  12/13
•   Billy Williams  12/13
•   Steve Thomas  12/16
•   Cheryl Warnock (Davies)  12/18
•   Jill Kiser (Jarvis)  12/19
•   Connie Coburn (Melvin)  12/20
•   Lee Ann Ison (Donta)  12/20
•   Jenny Henderson (Whitis)  12/25
•   Debbie Epling (Hughes)  12/26
Show More

WHERE WE LIVE


Who lives where - click links below to find out.

1 lives in Alabama
3 live in California
2 live in Colorado
1 lives in Delaware
15 live in Florida
8 live in Georgia
3 live in Illinois
1 lives in Indiana
1 lives in Kansas
231 live in Kentucky
2 live in Louisiana
1 lives in Maryland
2 live in Michigan
1 lives in Missouri
1 lives in Montana
10 live in North Carolina
16 live in Ohio
3 live in South Carolina
3 live in Tennessee
8 live in Texas
6 live in Virginia
1 lives in Washington
5 live in West Virginia
1 lives in Alberta
57 location unknown

MISSING CLASSMATES


Know the email address of a missing Classmate? Click here to contact them!

JOINED CLASSMATES


Percentage of Joined Classmates: 57.4%


A:   224   Joined
B:   166   Not Joined

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Paul G Blazer High School
Class Of 1975
ANNOUNCEMENTS

It is great sadness that we announce the death of classmate Tony Campbell of Lake Worth, Florida. Tony passed away November 20, 2016 due to heart problems. Tony will be lovingly remembered by his family, including his son, Scott Campbell, grand-daughter, Alaina Crownover, sister, Vicki Senters.

Private cremation services are under the care of Tillman Funeral Home & Crematory, 2170 S. Military Trail, West Palm Beach.

Please keep Tony and his family in your thoughts and prayers.

 

Our deepest sympathy to classmate Keith Shimfessel on the death of his mother, Betty Martin Shimfessel, on November 19, 2016. Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 23 at Steen Funeral Home - 13th Street Chapel at 2 p.m. Visitation is Wednesday noon - 2 pm.  Contributions can be made to Beech Street Christian Church Building Fund, 1672 Beech St., Ashland, KY 41102 or to Community Hospice 1480 Carter Ave, Ashland Ky 41101. Please keep Keith and his family in your thoughts and prayers.

Congratulations Melinda Gibbons Prunty for winning the Kentucky House 15th District.

WESTERN KENTUCKY (11/8/16) — A newcomer to the state political scene, Melinda Gibbons Prunty, R-Greenville, has upset longtime state Rep. Brent Yonts, D-Greenville, for the Kentucky House 15th District. Following the flow of other Kentucky offices up for grabs, the win went to a Republican.

Prunty successfully ran her very first campaign on the platform of right to life, promoting coal, jobs and “a fresh, energetic change”.

After the polls closed, Prunty said she attributed the win to the fact that people in Kentucky want to take a different path.

“I believe people are ready for a change,” said Prunty. “I’m humbled. After hearing about all the issues from the voters, I want to do the best I can. It’s an awesome opportunity.”

When she takes office in January, Prunty said she wants to hit the ground running by tackling the state’s “antiquated adoption laws”. The grandmother of adopted twins, she said the current laws are not good for prospective parents nor birth parents.

Unofficial tabulations indicate Prunty won her portion of Hopkins County over Yonts by a 3,391 to 2,073 margin, and won Muhlenberg by a 7,206 to 5,900 margin.

Yonts, who was reached at home tonight, was surrounded by his family. He said although he wishes Prunty the best, he believes she has no idea of what she is in for with the upsets of several other races in the state.

“We were the only Democratic chamber left in the south,” said Yonts. “We knew we were facing a tsunami coming into this year but the Speaker of the House asked the seniors not to retire yet, and so I stayed on. I’m proud of the job I’ve done and proud to have served.”

Yonts said the “tsunami” effect was the result of many voters pulling the straight Republican ticket.

WESTERN KENTUCKY (11/8/16) — A newcomer to the state political scene, Melinda Gibbons Prunty, R-Greenville, has upset longtime state Rep. Brent Yonts, D-Greenville, for the Kentucky House 15th District. Following the flow of other Kentucky offices up for grabs, the win went to a Republican.

Prunty successfully ran her very first campaign on the platform of right to life, promoting coal, jobs and “a fresh, energetic change”.

After the polls closed, Prunty said she attributed the win to the fact that people in Kentucky want to take a different path.

“I believe people are ready for a change,” said Prunty. “I’m humbled. After hearing about all the issues from the voters, I want to do the best I can. It’s an awesome opportunity.”

When she takes office in January, Prunty said she wants to hit the ground running by tackling the state’s “antiquated adoption laws”. The grandmother of adopted twins, she said the current laws are not good for prospective parents nor birth parents.

Unofficial tabulations indicate Prunty won her portion of Hopkins County over Yonts by a 3,391 to 2,073 margin, and won Muhlenberg by a 7,206 to 5,900 margin.

Yonts, who was reached at home tonight, was surrounded by his family. He said although he wishes Prunty the best, he believes she has no idea of what she is in for with the upsets of several other races in the state.

“We were the only Democratic chamber left in the south,” said Yonts. “We knew we were facing a tsunami coming into this year but the Speaker of the House asked the seniors not to retire yet, and so I stayed on. I’m proud of the job I’ve done and proud to have served.”

Yonts said the “tsunami” effect was the result of many voters pulling the straight Republican ticket.

Melinda told classmate Pam Stapleton Walter that she is "Humbled and Honored with her Win."

IN OUR VIEW  (From ADI)

Farewell to Blazer pool

School has higher priorities; swim team will continue

For more than a half century, the swimming pool at Paul G. Blazer High School has been a source of both community and school pride and the envy of high schools throughout the state. However, instead of being an asset, the pool has become a major safety hazard with the roof threatening to collapse with the next heavy snowfall.

Before that happens, school officials hope the pool will be demolished and nothing more than a pleasant memory where generations of young Ashland swimmers learned the skills that helped them win state titles and earn college scholarships.

Architects and engineers have determined the roof above the pool is so weak that school officials have received state permission to declare demolishing the pool an emergency, which greatly streamlines the process.

If the roof above the pool were to collapse, damage would not be limited to the pool area. Architects and engineers have determined the pool roof and those of the James A. Anderson Gymnasium, the gym lobby and an adjacent building containing classrooms, are structurally interconnected; failure of the pool roof could cause parts of those buildings to come crashing down, said building and grounds administratrator Richard Oppenheimer.

Demolition of the pool building became a foregone conclusion after a recent engineering study showed serious corrosion in ceiling joists, Oppenheimer said. The building and the pool had other issues that would have cost between $2 million and $3 million to remedy, money the district can’t spend on a pool while it is still upgrading classroom buildings at the high school.

The pool has been sealed off and the Ashland Independent Board of Education made what Oppenheimer called “the difficult decision” to demolish it.

Still undecided is what to do with the space after the pool is gone. Possibilities include leaving the space as an open courtyard, pouring a concrete pad on it or erecting new classrooms.

Blazer will still maintain a swim team, athletic director Mark Swift said. The team will practice five times a week at the Ashland YMCA and will host some meets there as well, Swift said. School officials are working with the YMCA to coordinate times the team can use the already crowded pool, he said.

The school district will pay students’ fees to the YMCA for use of the pool, he said. With six lanes, the YMCA’s pool is larger than the Blazer pool, which has four.

Having a swimming pool at its high school is a luxury the Ashland Independent School District can no longer afford. There are dozens of much higher priorities in the city’s school system than maintaining an aging swimming pool that has become a liability instead of an asset.

Former swimmer mourns loss of pool

The swimming pool in Building 7 of Paul G.

Blazer High School has been a long-standing feature of the building and, more importantly, of the school. When you walk in for any type of event in Building 7, the first thing you see behind the glass wall is a fourlane pool.

In recent years, this pool has been let go by the school district. This pool has history like none other in our area, including being the home of five state championship swimming teams for the Tomcats (1972, 1973, 1976 for boys and 1977 and 1978 for girls). From the countless sport teams who jump in after winning a big game to state championship teams, individual state champions and countless college athletes, there have been good times in that pool. But most importantly for the swimming community, it has been a place to find an extended family.

My experience with swimming started in the 2008-2009 school year. I was an eighthgrader who had played various sports in Ashland but had never really found one where I felt like my teammates were family. My whole extended family living in North Carolina made me desire a sport like swimming where I could call people, teammates and friends family. Swimming did that for me. They didn’t look down on anyone because they were new or because they were younger. Anyone who has been to a meet knows what it is like.

My first two years, I saw a lot of success from the upperclassmen, six of which went on to swim in college. Joe Gannon, John Leistner, Zach Johnson and Josh Johnson swam for the University of the Cumberlands, Erin Frye swam for University of Cincinnati and Lamar Linton swam for University of Louisville.

In two years, the swimming program brought in scholarship money for local families. Although the swim team did not bring in direct revenue for the school, it did help bring back money to families in the Ashland area. When I was a senior, I decided I wanted to follow in the footsteps of those who had gone before me and swim in college. I ended up at Asbury University, where I received a scholarship. My family had put a lot into swimming, from driving to meets, hotel rooms, gear I needed, etc., and it all finally paid off when I signed my letter of intent in January 2013.

Swimming not being a very popular sport in Ashland hasn’t seen any other college athletes since I graduated. This year, there is one from Ashland, Kenzie Pennington, who has been swimming since she was little. She said to me recently, “It makes me angry that my sport isn’t taken into consideration and that money was found to restore Putnam Stadium but none was found for the pool.” Kenzie is a senior at Blazer and is looking at different colleges for next year. She has taken visits to Cumberlands, Ashland University in Ohio, Catawba College in North Carolina and Wright State.

Anyone who has been to a swim meet at Blazer knows what it looks like when teams cheer for their opponents. You don’t see them hating each other but rather cheering on their friends from different schools. My senior year, I would call the parents from other schools my “swim parents.” They were always at my meets, cheering for me and helping me out any way they could, just like my parents did, and my parents did that for their kids as well. If someone couldn’t go to a meet because their parents couldn’t take them, there were always offers from various people. It didn’t matter that I wasn’t their child. They just wanted to see me succeed in and out of the pool.

Other local schools have seen success with swimmers competing in college. Recently Kelsey Marshall swam for Lindsey Wilson College and Eli Barnhill is a senior at Russell and is looking at colleges to compete at next year.

Although this is all in recent years, I don’t think anyone knows how many swimmers have come through and ended up swimming in college. The pool dates back pretty far and there have been countless state champions who have gone on to compete. One is diver Meg Neyer, who won 15 U.S national diving titles, and eight NCAA Diving Championships. She was also a part of the ill-fated 1980 United States Olympic Team.

Ashland resident Shane Strait is one of many who came through the program. He was a part of the 1976 state championship team and won state individually in 1977 in the 200 free. He then went on to swim at Western Kentucky University on a scholarship. When asked about his thoughts on the closing of the pool, he said, “It is sad to see that the Ashland Board has completely neglected the pool for so long. And now the decision to tear it down without plans to rebuild it. That pool had a lot of blood, sweat and tears from some of the training that we did there. It is sad to see Ashland go back to where we were in the 1950s.”

When Ashland knocks down the pool, they aren’t just knocking down a pool, they are knocking out scholarships, family, friends becoming family, and so much more. Before the pool is gone, everyone should stop by Building 7 of Blazer, walk back to the pool and reflect on what was one of Blazer’s greatest assets.

PARKER TOUCHTON is a former swimmer at Paul G. Blazer High School.

 


 

 Ashland school officials are meeting with contractors and working out plans to demolish the swimming pool building at Paul Blazer High School as quickly as possible.

Tearing down the building before the snow flies is important because its aging roof is too weak to support a heavy load, and if it collapsed it might take parts of adjoining structures with it, according to buildings and grounds administrator Richard Oppenheimer.

Architects and engineers have determined the pool roof and those of the James A. Anderson Gymnasium, the gym lobby and an adjacent building containing classrooms all are structurally interconnected, and that failure of the pool roof could cause parts of those buildings to come crashing down, Oppenheimer said.

Demolition of the pool building is a foregone conclusion after a recent engineering study showed serious corrosion in ceiling joists, according to Oppenheimer. The building and the pool itself had other issues that would have cost between $2 million and $3 million to remedy, money the district can’t spend on a pool while it is still upgrading classroom buildings at the high school, Oppenheimer said.

The pool has been sealed off and the board made what Oppenheimer called “the difficult decision” to demolish it earlier this year.

The district has secured permission from the state to declare the project an emergency, which should streamline the process for bids and awarding a contract.

Still undecided is what to do with the space after the pool is gone. Possibilities include leaving the space as an open courtyard, pouring a concrete pad on it, or erecting new classrooms, according to Oppenheimer.

Blazer will still maintain a swim team, athletic director Mark Swift said. The team will practice five times a week at the Ashland YMCA and will host some meets there as well, Swift said.

School officials are working with the YMCA to coordinate times the team can use the already crowded pool, he said.

The school district will pay students’ fees to the YMCA for use of the pool, he said. With six lanes, the YMCA’s pool is larger than the Blazer pool, which has four.

Locals will remember the Blazer swim team’s glory days in the 1970s, when it won multiple state championships. The pool also has been the traditional site of celebratory dunkings when other Blazer athletic teams brought home state titles and sometimes when opponents defeated the Tomcats in basketball.

 

 

 

ASHLAND Ashland Elks Lodge 350’s fourth annual fundraiser for Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital’s “Pretty in Pink” program raised $5,125.

The Oct. 1 fundraiser consisted of a silent auction, a 50/50 drawing and several items for sale.

“The ‘Pretty in Pink’ program provides not only mammograms for the underinsured, those with high deductibles or not insured at all, but it also helps with the cost of ultrasounds, prosthesis or bras for those that have had a mastectomy and wigs for those going through chemo,” Beth Wilson, the Breast Care coordinator at OLBH, said. The Women’s Center does approximately 700 to 900 mammagrams a month.

Wilson, along with Chuck Charles, vice president of advocacy,founLuann Serey, director of foundation/community services, Margaret Ward, nurse navigator of women’s center and Kevin Halter, CEO, received a check from Lydia Crawford, Shelly Knopf, Jenny Cordle, Sherry Suttles and Bill Grace, all Elks Lodge members.

Crawford, who has been cancer free for more than a year and a half, said she cannot stress enough how important the exams are, for not only women, but for men, too.  

OLBH also offers two support groups for women who have breast cancer. Breast Cancer Support Group group meets monthly at Bellefonte Centre at 1000 Ashland Drive.

Look Good ... Feel Better is a free, nonmedical program that helps women cope with the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment by teaching them beauty tips that can help enhance their looks and boost their self-images. In addition to changes in a patient’s physical condition, chemotherapy and radiation can cause increased susceptibility to infection. Look Good ... Feel Better features experts trained to help patients deal with the physical side effects of cancer treatment and to promote good hygiene.

For more information, call the OLBH Women’s Center at (606) 836-7465.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Lisa Blanton Hammond in the death of her father, Bill Blanton, on Sunday, Oct. 9th at the Community Hospice Care Center in Ashland. Mr. Blanton's funeral was Oct. 11th at Lazear Funeral Home.

Jerry Adams looks over the 500 bags full of food for the Boyd County Family Resource Center on Wednesday. Adams, a member of the Elks in Ashland, helped secure a $2,500 Promise Grant. The Lodge is also donating 500 jars of peanut butter.

The Ashland Elks lodge is making good on its promise to reach out and support the community.

Lodge 350 received a $2,500 Promise Grant from the National Elks Foundation. It will be used to help the Boyd County School District Family Resource Center’s Backpack Food Program.

The grant is available to lodges that meet the national president’s per-member goal for giving to the Elks National Foundation.

It must be used for local, charitable activities that range from mentoring youth to hosting events for homeless veterans to providing fresh produce for local food pantries.

Grant coordinator Jerry Adams and more than 25 volunteers met Sunday and filled 500 bags of food to be given to the resource center.

The bags include oatmeal, popcorn, juice, breakfast pastries, other food items and drug- awareness material.

“Everyone here is a volunteer. They do this because it’s all about the children,” Adams said.

The bags were loaded and taken to the resource center Wednesday with the help of Vicki Caniff, coordinator of the resource center, and her staff.

Family resource and youth services centers were designed to address needs of students and families through the provision of services and support. The backpack program started in 2004 at Boyd County Middle School, and has grown to assist more than 250 children, Caniff said.

In past years, the food program was largely funded by the Food Feud between Boyd County schools and the Ashland Independent School District. This year’s feud will be between the Boyd County schools because Ashland has decided not to participate.

“Because the Food Feud generated almost 35,000 pounds of food, it is a blessing to have been given these 500 bags,” Caniff said.

Adams said the lodge will also supply 500 jars of peanut butter to the resource center.

“These volunteers are the heart of the lodge. They do not do this for recognition, but to help make sure that the children of our community are provided for,” said Clyde Ramey Jr., the lodge’s exalted ruler.

You may have read about embattled swimmer Ryan Lochte’s appearance on “Dancing With the Stars” the other night, when protesters rushed the stage and caused a near riot on live television during the show’s first night.

I’m not saying we will have an exact repeat of that in February when “Dancing With Our Stars,” Highlands Museum fundraiser, takes place at the Boyd County Community Center, but don’t be surprised if there’s not some cries of anguish (and laughter) when one dancer takes the stage.

Say hello to “The Gorilla,” who will put on his dancing shoes for a good cause.

“The Gorilla” would be me, a nickname picked up during some “dancing” moments with some Ugandan friends the past two years. Now they know how to dance in Uganda but, clearly, I do not. However, the love they showed me would likely be far greater than I experience in February.

Three words: I cannot dance.

Not a step.

Not a waltz.

Not a dipsy-do.

But in a weak moment, the persistent Carol Allen, the Highlands CEO, convinced me that this would be a good idea.

It was against my better judgment and that of my wife’s that I said yes to this insane involvement. My wife, who supports me in all my crazy shenanigans, from running (walking?) 5Ks to playing an all-day Whiffle ball tournament, to so many other things you probably wouldn’t believe. Even she said, “I don’t know if that’s a good idea. Tell her no thank you.”

And then I didn’t. I tried to put off Carol but she kept coming at me. She was a shark and I was chum.

“Carol, I really can’t dance. Like at all.”

“Oh, that’s OK. It’ll be fun. We’ll give you a great partner.”

“But really, Carol, you know I love the museum. But I’m not a dancer. I can’t dance. Not a step.”

“You know we don’t care about that. It’s all fun, just fun. Oh come on, please, the museum could really use your help.”

She was reeling me in.

I’ve seen the list of the other celebrity dancers (all better and younger than me) but I won’t steal Carol’s thunder on an announcement.

My dancing partner, Melanie Cornelison, the education/outreach director for the Paramount Arts Center, will have the toughest teaching job of her career. It’s likely impossible. I’m already feeling bad for the frustration that will come as she finds out my only genre is dancing like a gorilla.

I went to dances in high school but it was always embarrassing (especially for my dates). There’s no rhythm in these shoes. Not then. Not now.

I’m sorry Melanie. Either Carol thinks you’re the greatest dance teacher of all time or she doesn’t like you. Either way, it’s bad for you. I can only offer a thousand apologies in advance.

On the other hand, this could be your greatest work if we can pull off not being rushed off the stage like Ryan Lochte — and I’m not making that up!

 

 

 

Our condolences go to Jennie Clay Whitt in the death of her mother, Genie Webb Clay on Sept. 16, 2016 at the Comunity Hospice Care Center in Ashland. Funeral services will be held at 11am on Sept. 19 at Miller Funeral Home. Visitation is today (9/18) at the funeral home from 5 to 7. Mrs. Clay was also the mother-in-law of classmate, Eddie Whitt.

Our condolences to classmate Jim Anderson on the death of his brother, William David "Bill"Anderson on September 12, 2016. Funeral services were held on Thursday, September 15 at Steen Funeral Home. Condolences may be left at steenfuneralhome.com. Please keep Jim and his family in your thoughts and prayers.

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of classmate Melissa (Missi) Joann Moore on Sunday, September 4, 2016. Funeral arrangements are in the care of Steen Funeral Home. A Private grave side service will be held on September 7, 2016. Please keep Missy's family, especially her boyfriend, classmate Brian Powell and cousins, classmates Debbie Click Smith, David Click, Lloyd Rayburn and Joe Ed Hemlepp in your thoughts and prayers.

KDMC team members were recognized recently for Years of Service milestones. Congratulations to Jennie Clay Whitt, RN, CT Scanner Imaging Center, who has been with King's Daughters for 40 years!

For the past 11 years, Jennie has worked as a nurse in CT Scanner Imaging preparing patients for their scans through assessments and starting IVs. Jennie began her career at King's Daughters fresh out of nursing school in the mid 70s. Throughout the years, she has successfully held nursing positions in the ICU, on the floor, in Med-Surg and Interventional Radiology.

Jennie said team members at King's Daughters impressed her from the beginning. "I grew up here. It's like family. From my very first day, I've been struck by how nice the people who work here are," she said.

The patients are why she's devoted her career to the medical center. "It's very rewarding ... the patients are what keep you here," she said. "In CT, we have patients, such as those for oncology, who come see us on a repeated basis. I have patients who let me know they like being scheduled when I'm working. It's very rewarding to serve them and get to know them."

Please join us in saluting Jennie for her many years of dedication to King's Daughters and the service of our patients!

GRAHAM, Ky. (8/23/16) — Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin appeared at a fundraiser for Melinda Gibbons Prunty on Tuesday afternoon in Graham. Gibbons Prunty is a candidate for the Kentucky House 15th district, which is currently held by longtime incumbent Brent Yonts.

The event drew a huge crowd at Short’s Family Restaurant showing strong momentum behind a demand for change in the status quo in Frankfort. Among the dignitaries who attended were state Rep. Jerry T. Miller and state Sen. C.B Embry.

Bevin said he’s helping Gibbons Prunty because he needs more people in the House, who support the conservative agenda that will fix the state’s financial challenges and defend Kentucky’s values.

“Tax reform, a more business friendly regulatory environment, fixing our broken pension system — all things that have been blocked by Brent Yonts and other liberals in the House,” said Governor Bevin, “that’s why we need new leaders like Melinda Gibbons Prunty; leaders who care more about fixing the problems that have lingered in state government for decades than they do about winning their next election. I like her passion, I admire her strong Christian values and I believe she will be a breath of fresh air in Frankfort.”

Prunty said she is honored to have Bevin’s support in her race.

“Gov. Bevin has shown a willingness to tackle hard issues and work towards permanent solutions instead of continuing to kick the can down the road,” said Prunty. “That’s the kind of state representative I will be, one who doesn’t care whose idea it is, only if it’s a good idea that will help the Commonwealth.

“My hope is that with non-career politicians, former military, strong Christians with business backgrounds in both our governor and lt. governor, Kentucky could become the model for the rest of the country. But we need to flip the House and give them cooperation to get meaningful legislation passed,” Prunty continued.

Prunty has called the 15th District home since 1984, when she moved to the area with her husband, Dr. Marshall E. “Eddie” Prunty, to help establish his medical practice. In that time, she has established deep roots, raising three daughters, moving her parents to the district and serving the community in a variety of roles throughout the years.

Our deepest sympathy to Dreama Felty Wallace on the death of her brother, Robert Ernest Felty on Wednesday, August 24, 2016. Funeral services will be held Friday, August 26 at 1PM at the Steen Funeral Home 13th Street Chapel. Friends may call after 12:30PM at the funeral home. Condolences may be sent to steenfuneralhome.com. Please keep Dreama and her family in your thoughts.

Our condolences to classmate Dean Young on the death of his brother, Rick Young on August 14, 2016. A celebration of Rick's life was held August 18, 2016 at Steen Funeral Home.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in Rick’s memory may be made to Shelter of Hope, 2944 Winchester Ave, Ashland, KY 41101; or to Traeger Transplant Program c/o Jewish Hospital and St. Mary’s Foundation, 250 East Liberty Street, Suite 612, Louisville, KY 40202, or online www.kentuckyonehealth.org/giving, 502-587-4543.
Online condolences may be sent to www.steenfuneralhome.com.

Please keep Dean and his family in your thoughts and prayers.

Classmate Kim Beckstrand Mayer created this beautiful poster. She has made prints of it and is selling them for $20.00 plus $3.00 s/h each. 100% of the proceeds go to helping women attend a retreat that Kim hosts for Survivors of Sexual Trauma. What a positive message for young girls. I am putting mine in my granddaughters's room! If you are interested you can email Kim through the class website.

With great sadness we announce the passing of another 1975 classmate, Bruce Mullins.

Bruce died Sunday, August 7, 2016 in Community Hospice Care Center in Ashland.
He is survived by his wife, Jeri McDaniel Mullins.

Please keep his family in your thoughts and prayers.

Our deepest sympathy to Leighanne (Clark) and Keith Daniel on the death of Keith's mother, Ruth on August 7.  Funeral services were held Friday, Aug. 12, 2016, at Miller Funeral Home in Ashland by the Rev. James R. Daniel officiating. Burial in Golden Oaks Memorial Gardens in Ashland.
Condolences may be left at mfhfuneralhome.com.

Please keep Leighanne and Keith in your thoughts and prayers.

Our deepest sympathy to classmate Tom Cantrell on the death of his mother, Jennie Lou Cantrell who passed away Tuesday, August 2, 2016. Private services were held on Friday, August 5. Please keep Tom and his family in your thoughts.

 

Former classmate, Kim Beckstrand Mayer, lives in Garland, TX. Her mission in life is to help protect children from abuse. She and her husband have opened a home for girls called "Your Place". It's purpose is to provide at risk kids the skills they need to be successful productive adults, by mentoring and providing safe and productive activities for them. Your donations would be greatly appreciated. Please send a contribution to "Your Place" c/o Kim Beakstrand Mayer, P.O.Box 452372, Garland, TX  75045.

 

Our very own '75 classmate, Mark Maynard, has written a book about the 1961 Tomcats Basketball Team. The name of the book is "Teamwork".  Mark has also written a second book: "Tragedy and Triumph" about the 1967 championship football team and the tragic death of Joe Franklin.  You may order Mark's books by going to: www.markmaynardbooks.com